The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

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The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

Spices for Romance 

The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean
The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean
The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Ocean

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The Roe Mantic Gems
of the Ocean

 By Bron Hendrixson

"Don't let this get around, but caviar is said to be a great aphrodisiac. It has all the 47 vitamins known to man."
                                        ~ Earl Wilson~

A millionaire gourmet tells the story of the evening he indulged in some stimulating caviar at Stockholm's plush Savoy Hotel. At the time he was The Roe Mantic Gems<br>of the Oceanonly an apprentice millionaire gourmet. He had no way of knowing that the potent, prolific sturgeon, which produces the fashionable fortifying fish eggs in erotic profusion, might be going the way of the passenger pigeon, the buffalo, and the bald eagle, that what many have called mankind's most civilized food may well be sacrificed for "civilization" (as those out to pave planet earth define the word). In fact, our gourmet was unaware of most of the many popular misconceptions about caviar. At any rate, when he finished his first delectable portion and the captain silver spooned some more choice Beluga on his plate, he was so pleased that he tipped the man extravagantly. No sooner had he finished this helping than the captain heaped a third serving on his plate, which called for another generous tip. This went on until the sated gourmet had the bill toted up. The caviar box was weighed and the budding gastronome was glad to be a millionaire, for he was charged for each provocative portion and presented with a bill which even he found "incredible," and which disproves the old dictum that if you have to worry about the price of caviar, you shouldn't order it.

The moral of this story, in the millionaire's words, is that "caviar is not... passed around like mashed potatoes." For caviar, like truffles and p4t~ de foie gras, is more than a mere delicacy; caviar is a symbol of elegance, the quintessential fare of czars and czarinas, queens and courtiers, kings and concubines. The choicest pearls of the Caspian and these sturgeon eggs are the only caviar worthy of the name, bearing no relation to the salmon eggs which make red caviar cost up to $100 for a "Russian pound" of 14 ounces today, and the supply is definitely limited. Indeed, the Colony, a posh New York restaurant, threatened to stop serving caviar not long ago because it was so scarce one helping would cost $20, and Romanoff Caviar, the chief American importer, has had to ration the fashionable fish eggs this year, for the United States has been allocated 140,000 pounds less Iranian caviar than the year before. Neither does the situation seem likely to change, even with the recent Russian announcement that they will market a synthetic product. This pseudo caviar has already been produced by the Soviet Union Laboratory of Physics, and Moscow plans a modern factory to capture the world market more than 100 capitalist firms are already bidding for rights to the ersatz combination of albumin, polysaccharides, organic products and carbohydrates, but it's safe to predict that the commissars' artificial fish eggs won't please the palates of many fastidious gourmet lovers.

Caviar has been regarded as a love food with few peers precisely because it is so elusive, expensive and delicious. No delicacy save truffles would be more appreciated by anyone's paramour at today's prices, but much medical opinion also vouches for the vaunted food's aphrodisiac powers. In cases of complete and partial impotence, Dr. William J. Robinson, who at one time headed Bronx Hospital's Department of Genitourinary Diseases, advised that his patients eat heartily especially of caviar among the foods he recommended as constituting a beneficial diet. Scheuer, for another, wrote in his Alphabet of Sex that "Many observers ascribe a beneficial influence to the eating of fish, oysters... and caviar..."


 
 
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The Roe Mantic Gems
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