The First To Row Across The Atlantic

The First To Row Across The Atlantic

Online Magazine

The First To Row Across The Atlantic

Out at Sea 

The First To Row Across The Atlantic

The First To Row Across The Atlantic

The First To Row Across The Atlantic
The First To Row Across The Atlantic
The First To Row Across The Atlantic

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Online Magazine

The First To Row Across The Atlantic

 By Erik Tierney

Carrying no sail or motor to tempt them, George Harpo and Frank Samuelson set out from New York Harbor on June 7, 1896, in their attempt to row across the Atlantic. The two fishermen rowed an ordinary 18 - ft. rowboat christened the Richard K. Fox, an open boat equipped with just a sea anchor, compass, signal lights, food and water, a tarpaulin for shelter in bad weather, and an oil stove that failed to work. The daring voyagers took breaks only for snacks of cold meat and biscuit during the day, keeping alternate three hour watches at night. Luckily they had tied themselves to the boat by lines, for they were upset by a giant wave in the mid-Atlantic and were able to get back to the boat and right her. Rowing all day every day, the intrepid pair finally reached the Isles of Sicily in 55 days, having averaged 56 miles of rowing a day. But they didn"t stop there. Harpo and Samuelson rowed on to Le Havre and then rowed up the Seine to Paris for a 3,200 mile crossing. Since their time, all the oceans of the world have been rowed, but the first transatlantic crossing still ranks as the greatest of them all.


 
 
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The First To Row Across The Atlantic