Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Online Magazine

Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Free Garden Tips 

Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal
Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal
Strawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal

Topics Guide


Online Magazine

Strawberry Propagation
and Renewal

By Robert Laurence

Free Strawberry Plants: Easy Propagation Methods

Except for the wild ones, strawberries do not come true from seed; that is, strawberry seed will yield plants unlike the plant it came from, plants with characteristics of the hybrid plant's ancestors. But itStrawberry Propagation<br>and Renewal isn't necessary to grow strawberries from seed. As noted, strawberries take care of propagating themselves admirably by sending out runners or daughter plants that root nearby. These can be used to renew the strawberry patch (see Strawberry Spacing Systems) by holding them in place with a stone, hairpin, clothespin, or small handful of dirt until they root. Or they can be allowed to root and then be transplanted to a new strawberry bed.

Propagating by Rooting

The strawberry runner plants grow in a pot sun in the ground, the plants held in place with a clothespin or hairpin. The best way to do this is to fill peat pots, cut down milk containers, or small flowerpots with good strawberry soil, sink them in the earth near the runners, and let the runners root one in a pot. Hold each runner in place with a hairpin, clothespin, or stone. When the runners are firmly rooted, sever them from the mother plants and transplant elsewhere. Peat pots can, of course, then be transplanted without lifting the plants from them.

New Life for an Old Strawberry Bed

If you don't want to start a new bed when production begins to fall off in the old strawberry patch, there is an alternative that works at least passably - although you should remember that commercial growers almost always plow under a bed after 2 years and usually do so after the first year's crop is picked. Nevertheless, up to one half production from an old bed (and sometimes more) can be maintained for 2 to 3 years or longer if the following method is used. Begin the renewal at the end of the harvest season in early summer - don't wait 2 or 3 weeks but get to work as soon as the berries have been picked. At this time run your hand or power mower, set on high (2 to 3 inches), through the strawberry patch, cutting off the tops of the plants (a scythe or hoe will do just as well). The plants will then put all their strength into producing new leaves and fruit buds for the next year (the more new leaves a plant has, the more berries it will produce). Help them along by weeding the patch thoroughly and fertilizing the remaining plants. Also turn under every other row in the patch, including all plants and any mulch that may be present. Runners from the alternate rows will soon fill up these now empty rows and you will get fruit from both the topped plants and their runners the following season more from the topped ones. If the plants don't send out many runners, encourage them to do so by digging in a little cottonseed meal around each plant. This method works best where very productive varieties like Pocahontas have been planted. When you use the hill system or spaced row system, no thinning of plants is necessary. With the matted row system, thin plants (that is, pull out excess ones) when weeding until the plants are 6 to 8 inches apart. Sprinkling an inch or so of compost through the bed after renewing is also a good idea. Within 2 to 3 weeks new foliage will appear on the plants, which will look so bad at first that you'll think you made a mistake following my advice, but in another 3 to 4 weeks they will be thriving.


 
 
All About Stuff An Online Magazine with Articles and Trivia on a Variety of Subjects
-
Strawberry Propagation
and Renewal